Alumni Crowning Achievement Awards

Congratulations to the following extraordinary Faculty of Education Alumni:

Dr. Allan Bonner BEAD ’78 (Business and Language Arts)
Distinguished Professional Achievement Award

As a journalist, educator, political advisor, mentor, author, and lifelong learner, Allan Bonner has tackled some of the most controversial and public issues of our time. Allan began as a journalist locally and then nationally in Canada and the US, and now holds graduate degrees in political science, education, business administration, law and urban planning.

Allan has worked with peacekeepers, international diplomats, oil, gas and chemical companies, and other blue chip clients on five continents. He is the author of eight books on communication, leadership, urban
planning, and crisis management.

Amy (Mickleborough) Moroz BEd’98 and Andrea (Gottselig) Ward BEd’00, MEd’10
Dr. Robert and Norma Ferguson Award for Outstanding Service

Amy (Mickleborough) Moroz and Andrea (Gottselig) Ward are best known as award-winning athletes in the U of R Cougar Womens’ Basketball program. Both graduated with education degrees and now work in Regina schools as teachers and coaches – lending their skills to the next generation of young basketball players.

In March 2018, they applied their collective energy and leadership skills to host of the U Sports Women’s Basketball Championship at the University of Regina. Together with an ensemble of Cougar and University
of Regina alumni, they delivered events and hospitality to eight teams from across Canada. The 2018 Cougar Women’s Basketball team captured the bronze and the championship weekend was among the most successful U Sports tournaments in the University of Regina’s history.

Associate Professor | Truth and Reconciliation Education

Dr. Michelle Coupal. Photo source: Laurentian University

As of July 1, 2018, Dr. Michelle Coupal will be joining the Faculty of Education, University of Regina as an Associate Professor in the area of Truth and Reconciliation Education.

Dr. Coupal has been working an assistant professor in Indigenous Rhetorics and Literatures in Canada at Laurentian University, and is herself an Indigenous scholar and member of the Bonnechere Algonquin First Nation. Her research and teaching interests include Indigenous pedagogies and profiles, pedagogies of reconciliation, teaching trauma and Indian Residential School literature, trauma and testimony, and Indigenous literatures of Turtle Island.

She brings a deep understanding of and commitment to truth and reconciliation education. Indeed, her record of research, scholarship, teaching and service while at Laurentian advances the TRC Calls to Action as she seeks to make connections between the stories writers tell in Residential school literature and the lives of their student readers. She fosters these connections through her teaching so that her students may become equipped with the tools and vocabulary to understand Indigenous peoples, literature and histories ethically, and to further consider how we are all shaped by the legacies of colonialism in Canada.

Dr. Coupal is currently the principal investigator on a SSHRC funded Insight Development Grant ($55,691) for her project Teaching Trauma and Indian Residential School Literatures in Canada. She has co-edited an anthology of work titled Honouring the Strength of Indian Women: Plays, Stories, and Poems by Vera Manuel and is currently working on a book to be published with Wilfred Laurier UP for the project Teaching Trauma and Indian Residential School Literatures in Canada. She has also published in peer reviewed journals, has published chapters in edited collections, and has disseminated her work broadly at local, national and international conferences. Further, she has served Laurentian University as a member of the organizing committee and Program Chair for MAAMWIZING: Indigeneity in the Academy; L’université à l’heure de la reconciliation held in November, 2016; as the designate for the Associate Vice-President Indigenous Program’s for the Council of English Language Programs, and as a member of several other University, Faculty and Department Committees.

 

Led by recent M.Ed. grad, Brittany Frick, Ituna School club runs on Girl Power!

Grades 4-6 students from Ituna School’s Girl Power club pose with their roundtable colleagues from the University of Regina. Photo: U of R Photography

Sometimes it’s the simple act of asking a question that can get a girl into trouble.

Ituna, 165 km north of Regina, is home to a small but mighty extra-curricular club for grades 4-6 students who identify as female. Girl Power, the creation of Ituna School principal and University of Regina alumna Brittany Frick, meets several times a year to discuss empowerment and opportunities for girls.

When ten Girl Power members, along with Frick and a parent chaperone, joined five women in University leadership around a boardroom table at the U of R on June 11, the girls came armed with a series of questions and stories of their own.

“I was made fun of when I asked, ‘Do cats run faster than dogs?’” said one of the grade 4 participants. “I just really wanted to know.”

Dr. Gina Grandy, Associate Dean Research and Graduate Studies and Incoming Dean of Business Administration, knows well the power of a question.

“Don’t be afraid to ask questions,” she shared with the girls. “Your belly may turn over, but don’t be afraid to ask even if it doesn’t come out just right. Questioning, and mistakes, are what help us learn.”

Grandy is the RBC Women in Leadership Scholar and the roundtable event was supported by the RBC Women Executive in Residence, the Hill and Levene Schools of Business, and Ituna School.

Girl Power roundtable participants from Ituna School talk with women in leadership at the University of Regina about empowerment. Photo: U of R Photography

Rae Staseson, Dean of Media, Art, and Performance, agreed. “Be curious, open, talk about things that matter to you, and ask questions!”

“I encourage each of you to talk to your teacher or someone you know who has gone to university. Ask them their story and what you need to do and how to do it,” shared Dr. Andrea Sterzuk, Acting Dean of Education.

Dr. Judy White, Dean of Social Work, shared that it was only later in life that she has found out about other career opportunities. “As a girl, I never knew that marine biology, for example, existed.” She encouraged the girls to take the time to be curious, travel, and consider every possibility before making their career choices.

Dr. Vianne Timmons, the University’s President and Vice-Chancellor, asked for a show of hands of how many of the girls were surprised that she was the president of a university.

As several hands went up, she asked why.

“Because you’re not a boy,” one student was quick to respond.

Timmons came from a strict East Coast family where, she said, roles were defined by gender early on.

“Our chores, as girls, were to do the dishes and clean the house. And we were told to be ‘nice girls,” she said. “Listen to how many times girls are told to be ‘nice.’ Boys are not.”

Heads nodded in agreement as Staseson stated, “That’s true. Caring, compassion, and empathy tend to be thought of as feminine traits. We are judged for how well we do those things and for how we look and even how we age; our male counterparts do not usually receive the same judgment.”

“I was bullied – they called me fat and lazy,” says a grade six student responding to a question by President Timmons about if the students had experienced bullying.

Unfortunately, many of the girls and women around the table were able to recall times when they had been bullied.

“Ask the why question,” another student offered. “That’s what we’re taught. Ask why the person is bullying you and let someone in authority know what’s going on.”

“Hang around people who lift you up, friends that make you feel good about who you are,” advised President Timmons. “And always look for opportunities and take them as they come your way.”

After the roundtable, Frick shared that, “The importance of a club like Girl Power is about helping students to realize that there are no limitations on their success. That being a girl is in no way a limitation. The roundtable proved that and was a great way for the club to end the year.”

Before heading home, Girl Power members were treated to lunch in the Riddell Centre and a tour of the University with another U of R graduate, Erica Chan, a member of the U of R Recruitment Services team.

By Katherine Cormack U of R Front Page Story

New Appointment: Associate Dean, Faculty Development and Human Resources

Dr. Patrick Lewis

Dr. Patrick Lewis, Professor (Early Childhood Education) will assume the role of Associate Dean, Faculty Development and Human Resources (FDHR), beginning July 15, 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Paul Clarke

Many thanks to Dr. Paul Clarke for his hard work, his outstanding contributions, and his dedication to the Faculty as he served in this role for the past four years.

Acting Dean Andrea Sterzuk says, “We are indebted to you Paul for your painstaking thoroughness in the process of performance reviews and the many searches conducted through the office of the Associate Dean, FDHR.”

 

NTEP 2018 Graduates | Taloyoak, Nunavut

Master of Ceremonies James Eetoolook. He shared his experiences growing up in the community, and between speakers, spoke of the history of Nunavut. For example, he recounted when the school was established, and talked about being punished for speaking his language. He reminded the people how late Inuit were granted the right to vote. I thought he did a splendid job. Proud day for him — his daughter graduated from the program.
The grads being introduced to those gathered for the ceremony (most of the people from the community): Yolande Apalu, Corrine Boisvert, Kristen Eetoolook, Lenny Panigayak, and Casie Totalik-Holwell.
Sarah Takolik lighting the Qulliq. James reminded everyone that the people would not have survived without the Qulliq which provides heat and light.
Steve Snowball was given the honor of speaking about each graduate. As an instructor, and a member of the community for two years, Steve clearly got to know each one in special ways and did a splendid job of celebrating each grad’s gifts and strengths. James provided translation services.
Gloria Uluqsi and Steve Snowball presenting three special awards from Nunavut Arctic College and other gifts and accolades.
Sheila Kolola, President of Nunavut Arctic College, and a proud NTEP graduate, too, conferring the NAC degree. Students received diplomas from NAC and the University of Regina.

NTEP graduation was held at the school.

Photos and captions are by Dr. Valerie Mulholland, Associated Dean of Student Services and Undergraduate Programs, who attended the ceremony held in Taloyoak, Nunavut on June 5, 2018.

Notice of Bereavement

It is with great sadness that we convey the sudden passing of Vicki Minhinnick (Olischefski) who was a member of our support staff for many years (1998 to 2008) in the Education Grad Studies Office. Vicki passed away on Sunday, June 10, 2018 at her cottage at Island View.

Vicki began her career at the University of Regina in 1977 as a Clerk in the College of Fine Arts, moving on to positions in Social Work, and then Education where she found her passion. Vicki provided a level of support and compassion not only to students but also her colleagues. She was incredibly valued in her role as Graduate Program Advisor, before retiring in 2008.

Retirement did not suit Vicki, and she quickly returned to her passion of helping others in the Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research in 2008 where she became a mentor and assisted all those around her. Vicki remained a part of the FGSR family and could be found stepping into any role and was always more than happy to help where she was needed.

Vicki’s smile was contagious and her positivity, humor, and compassion for others will reside with all those who knew and loved her forever.

A memorial service for Vicki will be held at the 4 Seasons Sports Palace at 909 Arcola Ave. East from 2 to 4 p.m. on Saturday, June 16, 2018. Rider/Maple Lead wear is encouraged.

Vicki’s obituary can be found by following the link:
http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/leaderpost/obituary.aspx?page=lifestory&pid=189279715

 

Faculty member recipient of McDowell Foundation Funding

Dr. Christine Massing

Dr. Christine Massing is a successful applicant for McDowell Foundation funding  for her study that explores the pre- and post-migration educational experiences of refugee children. The study received $10,000. Co-investigators are Daniel Kikulwe from the Faculty of Social Work and Katerina Nakutnyy—University of Regina Alumna and English as an Additional Language teacher at O’Neill High School, Regina Catholic Schools.

The McDowell Foundation, in funding the project, recognizes the importance of Dr. Massing’s work and the expressed desire to support this research and the contribution it will make to teaching and learning in the province.

 

Spring Convocation 2018 Prize Recipients

Paula Stoker, BEAD prize recipient, Spring 2018 Convocation

Congratulations to Paula Stoker on receiving the Bachelor of Education After Degree (BEAD) Convocation Prize, which was established to encourage and recognize the most distinguished BEAD graduate, with an overall internship rating of “Outstanding” and the highest grade point average in the program.

Paula graduated with a Bachelor of Education (Elementary) with Great Distinction. During her studies in the Yukon Native Teacher Education Program (YNTEP), which is offered in cooperation with Yukon College in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, Paula was the recipient of the Academic Silver Scholarship in 2017 and was on the Dean’s List in 2016 Fall, 2017 Winter, and 2018 Winter.

Born and raised in Whitehorse, Paula earned her first degree: Physical Education and Sports Studies from the University of Alberta in 1991. After following her passion for health, sports, and fitness, Paula came to the realization that she is a teacher at heart and that a classroom is where she is meant to be.

When the University of Regina decided to offer a Bachelor of Education After Degree program in cooperation with Yukon College, Paula jumped at the chance to finally become a certified teacher, “I am so very grateful for the opportunity to be able to get my Education Degree without having to leave my family and my Yukon home. Going back to school was a challenge at this stage of my life, but the many hands-on learning experiences in the YNTEP were so valuable and the opportunity to collaborate with and learn from my amazing classmates and teachers made the experience so enjoyable and worthwhile.”

Now that she has her Bachelor of Education, Paula will apply for a Yukon Teaching Certificate and looks forward to the opportunity to use her experience and education as a teacher in Whitehorse.

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Victoria Howe, STF Prize recipient, Spring 2018 Convocation

Congratulations to Victoria Howe (@MissVHowe) on receiving the Saskatchewan Teachers’ Federation (STF) Convocation Prize at the Spring 2018 Convocation. The STF prize recognizes the most distinguished Faculty of Education student, graduating with their first degree, who has an overall internship rating of “Outstanding” and the highest grade point average in the program.

Victoria graduated with a Bachelor of Education in Elementary Education with Great Distinction. During her studies, Victoria was the recipient of the Academic Silver Prize in 2016 and 2017. She was on the Dean’s List in 2015 Fall, 2016 Winter, 2016 Fall, 2017 Winter, and 2018 Winter.

Born and raised in Moose Jaw, Victoria attended Lindale and Caronport Elementary schools and graduated from Caronport High School.

Next, Victoria attended the University of Alberta and studied science. However, Victoria soon decided that a career working with children would be energizing and fulfilling. So she returned to Saskatchewan to attend the University of Regina’s Elementary Education program.

Victoria immensely enjoyed her three years in the Elementary program. During these years she engaged in many meaningful learning experiences, created very strong friendships, and grew greatly as an educator.

Her most memorable semester was her internship where she learned just how much teachers do for their students and just how rewarding the teaching profession can be.

While excelling in academics, Victoria’s love for dance and performing led her to join the Roughriders Cheer team. She volunteered on this team throughout her degree and continues to do so proudly. Victoria plans to substitute teach as she works on her Inclusive Education Certificate this upcoming fall. Upon completion of that certificate, Victoria hopes to pursue her Masters in Educational Psychology and then find work near her hometown of Moose Jaw.