Category: Awards and Recognition

Alumni Spotlight | Bushra Kainat

Bushra Kainat graduated with Distinction with her Baccalauréat en éducation secondaire and was the Fall 2021 recipient of the Saskatchewan Teachers’ Federation Award.

In today’s spotlight, we’re recognizing the student achievements of a new member of our alumni family, Bushra Kainat, who graduated in Fall 2021 with distinction with her Baccalauréat en éducation secondaire.
 
Over the course of Bushra’s program, she was the recipient of the Centennial Merit Plus Scholarship (2017 Fall), an Academic Silver Scholarship (2020 Fall), and an Academic Silver Prize (2021 Spring/Summer), and finally the 2021 Fall Saskatchewan Teachers’ Federation award recipient.
 
Bushra wanted to become a teacher because she says, “During my schooling, I met many educators that inspired me, and I wanted to be that inspiration to others. I have a passion for the French language and I wanted to share that passion with the next generation. I highly value education and learning, and wanted to encourage the same passion in the next generations.”
 
Among her University experiences, Bushra says, for her what was most memorable, was her second year in the Bac program, “which I spent at Universite Laval, where I got to experience the French language and the French culture first-hand.”
 
In terms of on campus experiences, Bushra especially enjoyed “having the opportunity to have some amazing professors!” Three of her professors were especially influential: “I really enjoyed Laurie Carlson Berg’s courses, as well as Stephen Davis’ courses. These two professor’s showed me the impact the educator has on the content being taught. They were very involved with their students’ progress and learning. Lucie Anderson was also an amazing educator. She gave us some of the best teaching advice I have received.”
 
From her experiences as a student, Bushra offers the following advice to current and future students: “My number one advice would be to take advantage of as many opportunities as possible. Join the club, apply for the award, participate in conferences, volunteer with an organization, etc. It will go a long ways! Not only will it help you gain experience, but you will develop many skills on the way.”
 
Bushra says, “The most significant aspect of earning her degree with the Faculty of Education was that “through this degree, I was able to gain a variety of experiences that helped shape me into the educator that I am becoming. From the variety of in-classroom experiences to the exposure to various learning and teaching environments, it all helped me build my skills as a teacher.”
 
Bushra began teaching with Saskatoon Public following her graduation, and she looks forward to returning to University of Regina for her master’s in education in the near future.

Vanier Scholarship Candidate | Jessica Madiratta

This week we are shining light on Jessica Madiratta, currently in her second year of a Doctor of Philosophy in Education program with the University of Regina. Jessica recently received the good news that she has been selected as a University of Regina candidate for the Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships–Doctoral Awards 2021-2022 competition. She will find out in spring if she has been successful in the national competition. For her dissertation, Jessica’s proposed research is a critical participatory action research project which she hopes will improve teaching practices through professional development in culturally responsive pedagogy. “This project challenges educators to build deeper relationships with their students, to bring in authentic learning experiences for students, and to explore social issues happening around student lives,” says Jessica.
 
Living up to her maiden name “Wesaquate,” which means “sharp as a whistle,” Jessica’s been a non-stop student on campus since 2006, earning her BEd from SUNTEP Regina in 2010, her MEd (C&I) in the Faculty of Education in 2015, followed by a BA in Indigenous Studies from FNUC in 2019. Jessica’s been working as a teacher with Regina Public Schools since 2010. Beginning in 2018, she took on the role of Indigenous Advocate Teacher at Kitchener Community School in Regina.
 
Jessica’s fondest memories come from her favourite MEd course, Culturally Relevant Pedagogy, which she took with Dr. Angelina Weenie (FNUC): “This class showed me the importance of decolonizing and indigenizing my classroom practices and shared the power of culturally relevant and responsive pedagogies. It had a huge influence on my PhD research topic. Someone should take this class if they are looking for ways to engage their diverse student population,” she says.
 
In Dr. Weenie’s class, Jessica had the opportunity to attend culture camp: “It was completely dedicated to Indigenous ways of knowing, doing, and being. I had the chance to learn from many elders, participate in a sweat, and to be on the land,” says Jessica.
 
Jessica, who grew up in Regina, and has roots with Piapot First Nation, considers the most significant aspect about earning her degree from the Faculty of Education, “is the opportunity to learn in my traditional territory with learnings connected to the Regina area.”
 
As advice to students, Jessica says, “Connect with other students. This gives you the opportunity to ask questions and learn from the experiences of those that have already started their schooling journey.”

Congratulations Class of 2021 (Fall)

Congratulations to the #UREDu Class of 2021! We are proud of you and your accomplishment! We wish you all future successes.

We also recognize our Faculty award recipients:

Thor Stewart, graduating with Great Distinction, and recipient of the Bachelor of Education After Degree convocation prize.

Bushra Kainat, graduating with Distinction with her Baccalauréat en éducation secondaire, and recipient of the Saskatchewan Teachers’ Federation Award

Join the celebration! Watch the Fall 2021 Convocation via Facebook livestream on today at 2 p.m https://www.facebook.com/events/301658671463816/

Inaugural fall 2021 recipients of the Associate Dean’s Graduate Student Thesis Award

Dr. Titi Olayele
Dr. Katia Hildebrandt

Congratulations to the inaugural fall 2021 convocation recipients of the #UREdu Associate Dean’s Graduate Student Thesis Award: Dr. Titi Olayele (BIPOC) and Dr. Katia Hildebrandt (the Faculty of Education nominee for the President’s Distinguished Graduate Student Award).

 
The Faculty of Education Associate Dean’s Graduate Student Thesis Award was established to recognize the outstanding academic performance of thesis-based graduate students (Master’s and PhD) in Education. Each recipient is a student in a graduate program in the Faculty of Education who has exemplified academic excellence and research ability, demonstrated leadership ability and/or university/community involvement, and whose thesis was deemed meritorious by the Examining Committee.
 
One award (of $2000) will go to an applicant who has self-identified as a Black, Indigenous, or a person of colour (BIPOC).
 
The second award (of $2000) will go to the Faculty of Education nominee for the Governor General’s Academic Gold Medal (Spring) or the President’s Distinguished Graduate Student Award (Fall).
 
There are four awards annually, each valued at $2,000, divided between two convocations:
*Two awards in Spring (from the list of eligible candidates for the Governor General’s Academic Gold Medal) and
*Two awards in Fall (from the list of eligible candidates for the President’s Distinguished Graduate Student Award)

View Dr. Olayele’s 3-minute thesis presentation

Inaugural recipients of the Associate Dean’s Graduate Student Thesis Award

Congratulations to the 2021 inaugural recipients of the #UREdu Associate Dean’s Graduate Student Thesis Award: Dr. Needal Ghadi (the Faculty of Education’s nominee for the Governor General’s Academic Gold Medal) and Dr. Rubina Khanam (BIPOC).

The Faculty of Education Associate Dean’s Graduate Student Thesis Award was established to recognize the outstanding academic performance of thesis-based graduate students (Masters and PhD) in Education. Each recipient is a student in a graduate program in the Faculty of Education who has exemplified academic excellence and research ability, demonstrated leadership ability and/or university/community involvement, and whose thesis was deemed meritorious by the Examining Committee.

One award (of $2000) will go to an applicant who has self-identified as a Black, Indigenous, or person of colour (BIPOC).

The second award (of $2000) will go to the Faculty of Education nominee for the Governor General’s Academic Gold Medal (Spring) or the President’s Distinguished Graduate Student Award (Fall).

FGSR Indigenous Entrance Awards Faculty of Education recipients

Congratulations to the 2021-2022 Faculty of Education recipients of the FGSR Indigenous Entrance Awards: Heather Carter (PHD), Dennis Daniels (MILED), Andrea Custer (MILED), Geneise Petford (MED), and Danielle Dietrich (MED)

The FGSR Indigenous Entrance Awards are designed to support newly admitted Indigenous graduate students at the University of Regina. Eligible students are nominated by each faculty on the basis of academic standing and leadership. Recipients are awarded a one-year, non-renewable scholarship that covers the cost of tuition and associated fees for the first year (3 semesters) of study.

Grad student recipient of Queen Elizabeth II Centennial Aboriginal Scholarship

The 2021 Queen Elizabeth II Centennial Aboriginal Scholarship of $20,000 has been awarded to Education grad student Natalie Owl “to assist her in obtaining a Doctorate of Philosophy in Education Interdisciplinary Studies from the University of Regina. Her research aims to improve the quality of Indigenous learning education and improve future health outcomes for Indigenous communities.”

“These scholarships help graduate and post-graduate students produce research that will have a positive impact on their area of study for the Province of Saskatchewan,” Advanced Education Minister Gene Makowsky said. “Congratulations to both recipients. I look forward to seeing the contributions of this important research to our province.”

Source: https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/news-and-media/2021/may/06/queen-elizabeth-ii-scholarship-recipients-announced

GA Award recipients

Congratulations to #UREdu Dr. Fatima Pirbhai-Illich and Dr. Fran Martin (UExeter) on being recognized by the Geographical Association with a Journal article award for Excellence in Leading Geography for their article, “Fundamental British Values: Geography’s Contribution to Understanding Difference” in Primary Geography.

The eCelebration took place April 8, 2021 on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GV-wM07mMwc

 

University of Regina 3MT® Competition winner

Congratulations to MEd student Whitney Blaisdell on winning the University of Regina 3MT® competition. Along with the recognition, Blaisdell takes home $1500 and she will represent the U of R in the Western Regional 3MT® competition.

The three-minute thesis competition proved to be a “great challenge,” says Blaisdell: “I was surprised at how challenging it was to attempt to describe the importance and current state of play, the research methods I used, the emergent theory, and the implications of the research in three minutes!”

Blaisdell says she benefitted from other aspects of participating in the competition, including the “opportunity not only to share this research on play in an accessible format but also to listen to other students share their fascinating and important research. The finalists had the opportunity to attend a workshop on presenting with Dr. Kathryn Ricketts that was so helpful.”

Overall, Blaisdell says that she has had, “a wonderful experience studying here at the University of Regina in the Faculty of Education with the supervision of Dr. Marc Spooner and the support of Dr. Valerie Triggs and Dr. Patrick Lewis as members of my committee.”

As for the future, along with supporting the offshoots of her current research and doing more research around play, Blaisdell plans to follow her own advice–to play: “I look forward to taking a small break to play and enjoy some warm weather with my family.”

The University of Regina Graduate Student Association (URGSA) described the competition as follows:

The Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is an internationally recognized competition for thesis-based graduate students in which participants present their scholarly and creative activity and its wider impact in 3 minutes or less. The challenge is to present complex research in an accessible and compelling way with the assistance of only one static slide. Created in 2008 by Dr. Alan Lawson at the University of Queensland, Australia, the 3MT® competition celebrates exciting and innovative graduate student research while promoting communication, public speaking, and storytelling skills. The competition offers an exciting and thought-provoking opportunity for graduate students, pushing them to consolidate their ideas and crystalize their research discoveries. Presenting in a 3MT® competition increases the capacity of graduate students to effectively explain their scholarly and creative activity in a clear and concise manner, and in a language appropriate to a general audience.

URGSA has posted a video of the competition to YouTube:

Outstanding Young Alumni Award Recipient – Christine Selinger

Christine Selinger BEd’11, BSc’11

Outstanding Young Alumni

Christine Selinger is a dedicated advocate, athlete and volunteer. While a student, she served as president of several student societies and received the President’s Medal for her academic achievements and extracurricular involvement. Selinger is an educator and emerging leader in the field of sex and disability. She is a two-time world champion in Paracanoe and, in 2010, she became the first paraplegic to traverse the rugged Nootka Trail off the west coast of Vancouver Island.

“After my injury, I was willing to try every sport I could, mostly because I wanted more social time with other people who have disabilities,” Selinger says. “I learned so much from my peers and I was eager to learn more. When I discovered paddling, I really fell in love with it. I loved being on the water and that kept me coming back each day. It didn’t feel like a chore to go to practice and I was eager to get faster and to keep up with my peers.”

Selinger sustained her spinal cord injury in a climbing accident at the age of 19. Subsequently, she completed two concurrent bachelor’s degrees in mathematics and education in 2011.

“My time at the U of R was transformative,” she says. “I feel that university in general is a time for discovery and I definitely felt that in my time with the U of R through both my studies and extracurricular activities. It gave me a view into the wider world that I was craving and chased after graduation. It gave me a view into the wider world that I was craving and chased after graduation. My university experience gave me a clearer idea of who I am and what I want to and can contribute to help my community thrive.”

Selinger worked as a peer support coordinator and instructional designer for the Canadian Paraplegic Association and Spinal Cord Injury Ontario. Through her openness and candor, she has had a tremendous impact on the lives of individuals with spinal cord injuries and other disabilities.

Selinger was a Canadian national Paracanoe athlete from 2008 to 2013, a two-time world champion, and Saskatchewan Athlete of the Month in August 2010. She was also shortlisted as International Paralympic Committee Athlete of the Month in August 2011.

In her professional and personal life, Selinger bravely faces challenges to help improve the lives of people with disabilities. Her contributions to promoting women in sport and her advocacy for the community of persons with disabilities, particularly related to issues of sex and intimacy, make her an extraordinary member of the University of Regina alumni community.

“I’m thrilled to receive an Alumni Crowning Achievement Award,” Selinger states. “Being recognized by peers and other alumni for my work means that the work is noticed. As someone who works in advocacy and awareness, that means a lot. It means I’m reaching people.”

When she’s not working, Selinger enjoys reading, playing games and crafting. She and her husband, Jerrod Smith, whom she met in a U of R modern algebra class, recently moved to Calgary after spending six years in Toronto and a year in Bangor, Maine. The couple have one dog named River, a mixed-breed rescue pup.

Reposted from https://alumni.uregina.ca/pages/alumni-awards/2020/Christine

Also see Where has your BEd taken you? Christine Selinger at https://www2.uregina.ca/education/news/alumna-christine-selinger/