Luther College, LC 210
University of Regina
Regina, SK, S4S 0A2
Tel: 306-337-2511  Fax: 306-585-5267
Email:
resolve@uregina.ca

OUR GOAL | OUR HISTORY

RESEARCH:

CLICK HERE FOR RESOLVE SASKATCHEWAN'S RECENT ACTIVITIES AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS

 

 


STATS CANADA - SELF-REPORTED INTERNET VICTIMIZATION IN CANADA

Stats Canada reports on the incidences of victimization on the internet. We have seen several incidences of cyber-bullying lately in the news that has resulted in the victims committing suicide.

Stats Canada - Internet Victimization

 

 

 
SEXUAL VIOLENCE ACTION PLAN
Working Together to End Sexual Violence

Kerrie Isaac, the director of the Sexual Assault Services of Saskatchewan, has spearheaded an action plan to end sexual violence in the province.  The aim of the research is to gain a better understanding of the existing strengths and potential gaps in service provision as it relates to sexual violence across the province of Saskatchewan. The research findings will be presented to the Saskatchewan Sexual Violence Action Plan Advisory Committee. This committee will develop and implement a province-wide sexual violence action plan that is comprehensive, coordinates across all professional sectors and levels of government, and reflects the needs of Saskatchewan people.  For more information, please go to their website at: http://sassk.ca/

 

 
FIRST RESPONDER TO SEXUAL ASSAULT AND ABUSE TRAINING

The SASS has also launched a program called First Responder to Sexual Assault and Abuse Training.  Originally used in Alberta, this innovative program will build capacity for professionals, volunteers and community members throughout Saskatchewan to assess and respond effectively to disclosures of sexual assault and sexual abuse.  Survivors who receive safe and supportive responses to disclosures of sexual violence are more likely to reach out for help from medical and counselling services and/or report to police. The First Responder training is designed to educate individuals about the social, cultural and legal aspects of sexual assault and abuse, which will enable them to recognize, define and respond appropriately to the continuum of behaviours that constitute sexual assault and abuse.  First Responder to Sexual Assault and Abuse Training™ is a comprehensive two-day training, inclusive of the full continuum of sexual violence across the lifespan. For more infomration, please go to their website at http://sassk.ca/

 

 
CANADIAN DOMESTIC HOMICIDE PREVENTION INITIATIVE

RESOLVE is now partner in a new study entitled, Canadian Domestic Homicide Initiative for vulnerable populations

The goal of this project is to save the lives of domestic violence victims and their children. Domestic homicides account for 26% of all violent crimes and 20% of all solved homicides in Canada in 2012 (Statistics Canada, 2013). Domestic homicides occur across Canada but some groups may experience greater risk. Research has indicated that the rate for domestic homicide is eight times higher for Aboriginal women comparedto non-Aboriginal women in Canada ( Statistics Canada, 2006a). The rates of domestic homicide in rural Canada are significantly higher than in urban areas ( Northcott, 2011). Children exposed to domestic violence are at greater risk for lethal violence. Between 2002 and 2009, there were 28 child deaths that occurred in the context of domestic violence in Ontario alone ( Ontario DVDRC, 2012). Immigrant and refugee populations experience several barriers that make it more difficult to report domestic violence and access services (Alaggia et al., 2009). Based on this research and the greater challenges for these populations to access culturally-relevant resources, the CDHPIVP will focus on these four vulnerable groups.

See their website at http://cdhpi.ca/ for more information.

 

 


CURA PROJECT - NORTHERN AND COMMUNITY RESPONSE
TO INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE - 2011-2016

OBJECTIVES. This study integrated several sources of data to create an action plan that maps the socio-spatial problem of intimate partner violence, creates narratives describing community response in rural and northern areas of the prairie provinces and NWT, and generate a theory of ways to create and sustain non-violent communities in these regions of Canada.

You can visit the project's website at http://www2.uregina.ca/ipv/  Here you will find the Saskatchewan region's final report and other interesting and informative documents.

Final Report - Alberta Region

Final Report - Saskatchewan Regina

Final Report - Northwest Territories Region

Final Report - Manitoba Region (not yet posted)

FINAL UPDATE: APRIL 2017
It's complete!  Our final report to the funder was submitted in February but we are still doing lots of KT work, presenting at conferences, working on manuscripts and articles, speaking to stakeholders.... Researchers discovered that each region is different and had unique results. In all four regions, researchers and graduate students used GIS mapping, interviews and focus groups to answer the project's three foundational research questions: 1. What are the needs of women living in rural and northern regions of Canada? Women in rural and northern areas have needs similar to those in urban areas; 2. What are the barriers that women face in meeting these needs? IPV is situated in a context that includes cultural attitudes towards violence, the legacy of colonization and poverty. Across the four regions, geography, transportation, and communication are three of the problems in rural and northern communities that are not seen in urban areas; 3. How do we create and sustain non-violent communities in these regions? Education, especially for children and youth, was found to be the primary requirement needed to foster healthy communities.

In ALBERTA, principal findings provide an understanding of intimate partner violence (IPV) community response that meets the needs of women in four areas: protective factors that harness personal and external resources; informal supports that include family, friends, and community members drawn from cultural, faith-based, and business organizations; formal services that leverage professional services across communities; and contextual influences that reveal how sub-population diversity, environment, and geography affect the daily life of women in rural and northern Alberta.

In MANITOBA, although services and supports have been developed for women who experience intimate partner violence, the needs of many women who live in rural and northern areas are not adequately met. Under these circumstances women "make do" by seeking safety with whatever means are available to them. The current response to intimate partner violence is primarily reactive rather than proactive and there is multi-system involvement without recognition of the whole. Strategies used to seek safety from violence are influenced by the unique context of rural and northern communities. This context includes (a) remoteness and isolation; (b) community politics; (c) lack of housing; (d) lack of/limitations of services and resources; and (e) lack of transportation.

Although the NORTWEST TERRITORIES reports violence against women nine times higher than the national average, there is little knowledge about family violence. In this study, the researchers explicated a grounded theory entitled "Our Hands are Tied" as the central problem in the community response to intimate partner violence. Three processes were identified: putting up with violence, shutting up about violence, and getting on with life. An action plan to address these issues includes knowledge mobilization, education, assessment and screening, a coordinated response, and community healing.

In SASKATCHEWAN, the research project determined that family violence is generational and therefore services need to target the entire family and from an early age. There are no non-legal responses to family violence, and the patriarchal model of the family has meant the sufferer faces homelessness and poverty. Suggestions to mitigate these challenges include removing the perpetrator from home and community rather than the sufferer, and providing local safe houses and cool-off houses.

KNOWLEDGE TRANSLATION/TRANSFER and RESEARCH CAPACITY

The team also did its part in developing research capacity by employing 16 undergraduate students, 15 graduate students and 7 others, all dedicated to the success of the research project.  So far we have had 4 journal articles published with many more submitted.  33 presentations have been made at conferences as well as poster presentations, there were several public presentations to stakeholders, several articles and interviews in the mainstream media have been done, several round tables and seminars have been presented, and many of our student researchers have been using the data collected for their masters and Ph.D. work.

To see the full report please click HERE.

 

 

RESOLVE Saskatchewan's research focus is based on the
themes depicted in our Healing Wheel.

To view current RESOLVE newsletters please go to the RESOLVE Manitoba website. To do an address change or be added to the mailing list contact Newsedit@umanitoba.ca

 

THE HEALING JOURNEY PROJECT KNOWLEDGE TRANSLATION

Knowledge Translation:

Please click on these links to view some knowledge translation from the Healing Journey project.

Hampton Presentation

Hampton-Bruyninx Healing Journey Summary Presentation

Hampton Report

Tutty Report

About the Healing Journey:

Resolve Manitoba launched an ambitious tri-provincial study of women who had experienced violence from their intimate partners. Our goal is to document the efforts women make to secure a safe and violence-free life for themselves and their family. While all of the women participating in our study share the experience of intimate partner violence, they all deal with experience in very different circumstances. In 2004 the RESOLVE team of researchers and community partners was awarded a $1 million grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) to finance this study entitled The Healing Journey: A Longitudinal Study of Women Who have been Abused by Intimate Partners. The project involves a longitudinal study of approximately 200 women in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

From the Research Proposal:

In the last two decades Canadians have witnessed an expanding number of services for women who have been abused by intimate partners. Concurrently, there has been a growing body of research in the social sciences, which has increased our knowledge through quantitative studies of the prevalence of the problem and through qualitative research we have heard the voices of women who have endured such abuse.

While the research to date has been rich in information and insight, no Canadian studies have been able to follow women over the longer period required by many to achieve safety and comfort in their homes. In addition, while there have been a few excellent comparative studies of access to services across jurisdiction, these studies have been limited to snapshot observations at one point in time. The Healing Journey Project is building on the strengths of past research to provide a tri-provincial comparison of the experiences of abused women over a longer period of time.

The contribution of this research to community-based agencies is expected to be substantial. The ability to follow a group of women over time, who have variously experienced assistance in shelters, counseling programs, utilized protection or prevention orders and may have experienced police and court interventions will provide agencies with a rich source of information on women's help-seeking behaviour, trajectories of healing, and children's issues. The contribution to policy makers is expected to be equally substantial. Through the voices of women and their lives and the lives of their children, we are learning about the most effective interventions, the challenges of breaking inter-generational cycles of abuse, the differential roles played by formal and informal help, and the merits of civil and criminal justice interventions. The contribution to the academic community will follow and we expect to inform theories of empowerment, understandings of the link between social policy and personal/social change and the most promising interventions for child victim/witnesses.

The study is providing a rich source of research material in the fields of psychology, sociology, social work, nursing, law and education.

Update - 2012 - This project is officially finished though coding, cleaning, and dissemination continues. There have been many applications to use the data gathered from this project.

See the website at http://www.thehealingjourney.ca/main.asp for more information.

 

New CARE Grant Awarded to Family Service Regina, Inc.

Family Service Regina recently received $10,000 in funding from the CARE Grant program for a research project entitled, Targets' Experiences of Stalking. This worthwhile project will use narrative inquiry methodology to collect stories and experiences of targets of stalking in Regina in order to document the impact that stalking has on the lives of targets and their loved ones. Results will be used to improve services to women who are stalked. The project is building on previous research that has resulted in training modules for police, justice, and front line service providers.

 

Provincial Association of Transition Houses (PATHS)
publishes new report on Saskatchewan's housing crisis

Saskatchewan’s Housing Crisis: Addressing the needs of Women and Children Who Have Experienced Violence. Please click here to view the report.

 

U.S. NATIONAL INTIMATE PARTNER AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE SURVEY

Please click here to view the report.

 

WOMEN IN CANADA: A GENDER-BASED STATISTICAL
REPORT - WOMEN AND THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

Please click here to view the report.

 

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF JUSTICE - VIOLENCE AND VICTIMIZATION RESEARCH
DIVISION'S COMPENDIUM OF RESEARCH ON VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN

TO OBTAIN A COPY OF THE FINAL REPORTS LISTED IN THIS COMPENDIUM SEARCH: HTTP://WWW.NCJRS.GOV

Where final reports are available in print, a NCJ number will be listed. All NCJ numbers listed herein can be searched through the "Library/Abstracts" link on the National Criminal Justice Reference Center (NCJRS) home page, http://www.ncjrs.gov. A search by NCJ number will yield an abstract of the final report as well as an Adobe PDF link to a copy of the final report or to the publisher’s website. Final reports may also be found through a search by Author, Title or Subject.

For example: The final report for 1997-WT-VX-0006 (An Evaluation of Family Advocacy with a Team Approach) has a product with NCJ# 187107 & 187110 (Evaluation of Victim Advocacy Within a Team Approach). To obtain this final report, search the NCJRS Abstracts Database through the "Library/Abstracts" link on the top of the home page. In the "NCJ Number" field, enter 187107 or 187110 and the search will provide a link to the final report abstract as well as the link to a copy of this final report in Adobe PDF.

NCJRS is a federally funded resource offering extensive reference and referral services about justice and substance abuse information to support research, policy and program development worldwide. The National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, is one of several federal sponsors of the NCJRS website.

 

TRANSITION HOMES IN CANADA - 2009-2010 - FACT SHEETS

The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics report, Transition Homes in Canada: National, Provincial and Territorial Fact Sheets, 2009-10, was released on October 25, 2011. This report expands on information first released in a June 2011 Juristat, “Shelters for abused women in Canada, 2010.” It reveals that there were almost 5,000 admissions of women and their children to shelters across Saskatchewan in 2009/10. On April 15, 2010, there were 408 residents in shelters in Saskatchewan, an increase of 113 residents (38%) from two years earlier: 43% were women and 57% were dependent children. 72% of women residing in shelters on that date were there primarily for abuse, a rate of 30 for every 100,000 women. This was the highest rate among the provinces and above the national rate of 23.

Please click here summary
Please click here for fact sheets.

 

Family Violence in the Canadian Arctic - Pauktuutit

Pauktuutit leads and supports Canadian Inuit women in policy development and community projects in all areas of interest to them, for the social, cultural, political and economic betterment of the women, their families and communities. Pauktuutit fosters greater awareness of the needs of Inuit women, advocates for equity and social improvements, and encourages their participation in the community, regional and national life of Canada.

To see the whole PowerPoint presentation, please click here.

 

NATIVE WOMEN'S ASSOCIATION OF CANADA

WHAT THEIR STORIES TELL US: RESEARCH FINDINGS FROM THE SISTERS IN SPIRIT INITIATIVE

As of March 31, 2010, the Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) has gathered information about the disappearance or death of more than 580 Aboriginal women and girls across Canada. This finding is the result of quantitative and qualitative research carried out over a period of five years. In 2005, NWAC secured funding for the Sisters In Spirit initiative – a five-year research, education and policy initiative supported by Status of Women Canada – to address the root causes, circumstances and trends of missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls. NWAC has collected the evidence to document, in systematic way, issues of violence that women, families, and communities had been pointing to for the last generation.

Sisters in Spirit 2010 Research Findings

 

RANKIN INLET SPOUSAL ASSAULT COUNSELLING
PILOT PROGRAM - FINAL REPORT

Click here to view the full report.