Category: Announcements

PhD candidates recipients of research awards

Miranda Field, PhD candidate, award recipient
Shana Cardinal, PhD Candidate, award recipient

PhD Candidates (Education Psychology) Miranda Field and Shana Cardinal are recipients of Indigenous Peoples’ Health Research Centre (IPHRC) and the Saskatchewan Centre for Patient Oriented Research (SCPOR) Research Awards. Each has been awarded $30,000 for their research, which aligns with IPHRC/SCPOR’s goals.

Miranda’s research will focus on the role of place within Indigenous mental health healing and learning and Shana’s research will focus on Indigenous perspectives of intergenerational trauma on student mental health.

The IPHRC/SCPOR award provides them with opportunity to pursue studies and research full-time, as well as to participate as IPHRC/SCPOR Trainees within a “growing hub of people engaging in decolonizing and emancipatory research that is designed to continuously improve the health and well-being of Indigenous peoples in Saskatchewan.” Congratulations Miranda and Shana

Faculty-Based Research Centre Funding

 

General Research Fund

Language Camps team
Dr. Pamela Osmond-Johnson
Dr. Xia Ji
Dr. Cristyne Hébert
  • Language Camps as an Indigenous language revitalization strategy: The nêhiyawak (Cree peoples) Language Learning Experience – Belinda Daniels (USask); Peter Turner (URegina); Randy Morin (USask); Bill Cook (URegina); Dorothy Thunder (UAlberta); and Andrea Sterzuk (URegina) – $4,440
  • Developing a community of practice during internship – Pamela Osmond-Johnson, and Xia Ji – $4,725
  • Fostering a maker mindset through pedagogical practices – Cristyne Hébert, Trevor Hlushko, Amy Singh, and Aaron Warner- $5,000

Community-Engagement Research Fund

Dr. Andrea Sterzuk
Dr. Anna-Leah King
Cheryl Quewezance
  • A study of a land-based and ceremonial mentor-apprentice approach to Saulteaux language revitalization – Andrea Sterzuk, Anna-Leah King, and Cheryl Quewezance – $4,500

Study of Teaching and Learning Fund

Dr. Kathryn Ricketts
  • Tent talks and hallways interventions – Kathryn Ricketts – $1,750

Knowledge Mobilization Fund

Dr. Anna-Leah King
Dr. Heather Phipps
Dr. Cristyne Hébert
Dr. Marc Spooner
Dr. Scott Thompson
  • Dreaming a beautiful world through the truth of âcimowin – Anna-Leah King – $750 and Heather Phipps $750
  • Playing at the margins: Feminist investigations of digital gameplay – Cristyne Hébert – $1,581.96
  • Panel Discussion/Book Engagement: Dissident Knowledge in Higher Education – Marc Spooner, Michelle Fine, Sandy Grande, and Joel Westheimer – $4,063.24
  • Ducks on the Moon: The Musical – Scott Thompson – $5,000

Faculty members recipients of a SSHRC Insight Development Grant

Dr. Pamela Osmond-Johnson
Dr. Michael Cappello

Dr. Pamela Osmond-Johnson and co-applicant Dr. Michael Cappello are recipients of a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Insight Development Grant of $59,498 for their research project entitled “Leading Reconciliation Education: The Strategic Advocacy of School Principals in the Prairies.”

Osmond-Johnson, Pamela – University of Regina $59,498
Cappello, Michael – University of Regina (co-applicant)
Dwyer, Kyran – Canadian Association of Principals (collaborator)
Lamoureux, Kevin – University of Manitoba (collaborator)
Lindeman, Carlana – No primary affiliation (collaborator)
Leading Reconciliation Education: The Strategic Advocacy of School Principals in the Prairies

Faculty member co-investigator in SSHRC Insight Development Grant

Dr. Barbara McNeil

Dr. Barbara McNeil is a co-investigator for a research study entitled “Experiences of Racialized Students in Education, Nursing, and Social Work University Programs in Saskatchewan.The investigators are recipients of a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Insight Development Grant of $56,161.

 

Novotna, Gabriela – University of Regina $56,161
Funke, Oba – University of Regina (co-applicant)
Gebhard, Amanda – University of Regina (co-applicant)
Hogarth, Kathy – University of Waterloo (co-applicant)
Luhanga, Florence – University of Regina (co-applicant)
McNeil, Barbara – University of Regina (co-applicant)
Experiences of Racialized Students in Education, Nursing, and Social Work University Programs in Saskatchewan

Doctoral candidate is recipient of SSHRC award

PhD candidate, Conor Barker. Photo courtesy of Conor Barker https://www.barkerpsychology.com/

Conor Barker, a school psychologist from Swift Current who is currently pursuing a PhD in Education (Education Psychology) from the University of Regina, is the recipient of a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Doctoral Fellowships Program Award of $40,000 for his research study entitled  “Using communities of practice to develop clinical competency with rural school psychologists.”

Abstract: The practice of a rural school psychologist is challenging, and can be fraught with aspects of isolation, role confusion, and burn out. In many rural communities the only qualified mental health professional may be a school psychologist, and as such, these psychologists require a great number of skills in order to meet the diverse needs of their community, as a referral to a specialist outside the community may not be feasible. To determine the competencies required of rural school psychologists, Conor is conducting a collective case study of rural school psychologists from across Saskatchewan using a Communities of Practice (Wenger, 1998) conceptual framework. Preliminary results have focused on the Knowledge, Skills, Attitudes, and Behaviours (KSABs) required of rural school psychologists, the ways in which rural psychologists gather in communities to maintain their competency, and their ability to use creativity when faced with difficult situations so that they can support students, schools, families, and communities. This study acknowledges the general-practitioner role that rural school psychologists play within the field of psychology, when present discourses tend towards a more specialized practice and discussion of clinical competency. It further describes the ways that rural psychologists can gather within communities of practice in order to sustain competent and ethical practices in psychology.

Conor says, “I would like to acknowledge the support from my committee, supervisors Dr. Laurie Carlson Berg and Dr. Joel Thibeault, and committee members Dr. Kristi Wright (Psychology), Dr. Jenn de Lugt, and Dr. Scott Thompson who assisted with the development of the SSHRC application. I also must acknowledge the work of Tania Gates who made sure the application was perfect before final submission. This was truly a group effort and I am very appreciative to the staff and faculty within the Faculty of Education.”

 

Canada Research Chair for Truth and Reconciliation Education

Dr. Michelle Coupal (Bonnechere Algonquin First Nation) joined the Faculty of Education in July 2018 as a Canada Research Chair of Truth and Reconciliation Education. Since completing her PhD in English at Western in 2013, Dr. Coupal (Algonquin/French) has achieved national recognition by her peers as an emerging scholar of considerable talent in the fields of Indigenous literatures, particularly Indian residential school literature, and Indigenous pedagogies. Dr. Coupal was appointed by the Indigenous Literary Studies Association (ILSA) as President-Elect (2017-2018), and beginning in November 2018, she will serve as President of ILSA (2018-2019).

Coupal regularly accepts invitations to organize and participate in national panel presentations, including the recent panel for the Association of Canadian College and University Teachers of English (ACCUTE) at Congress 2018 in Regina. Coupal’s contribution, “Irreconcilable Spaces: the Canlit Survey Course in the Indigenous Sharing and Learning Centre Round Room,” posed a challenge to CanLit’s hegemony, and suggested that CanLit is irreconcilably settled on Indigenous literary territories. Coupal also presented at a public event (co-sponsored by ILSA, ACCUTE, and CALCLAS) at Congress 2017, where she, alongside an illustrious panel of speakers including Dr. Warren Cariou (Métis), Dr. Kim Anderson (Cree/Métis), Sarah Henzi, and renowned Mushkego storyteller, Louis Bird (Swampy Cree), presented original work on ways to incorporate Indigenous positioning protocols into the classroom as a means to foster a healthy entry point into and dialogical relationship with the stories Indigenous writers tell. Coupal ultimately considered how positioning protocols can be mobilized to encourage activism and advocacy that extends beyond the classroom setting.

This demonstrated public presence and scholarly recognition are closely tied to Coupal’s research productivity. Coupal’s book-in-progress, Teaching Trauma and Indian Residential School Literatures in Canada, was awarded a SSHRC Insight Development Grant (2016-2018), and will be published by Wilfrid Laurier University Press. Coupal’s ground breaking work embodies Indigenous methodological strategies that include a clear focus on both the theory and praxis of bringing difficult material into largely settler classroom settings. By combining Indigenous understandings with Western ones, Michelle makes her work accessible to the wide reading public so as to move forward the project of responding to the educative Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (TRC).

Coupal is co-editor (with Deanna Reder [Cree/Métis], Joanne Arnott [Métis], and Emalene A. Manuel [Secwepemc/Ktunaxa]) of a collection of the works of Secwepemc/Ktunaxa writer Vera Manuel, which is in press with the University of Manitoba’s First Voices First Texts series edited by Warren Cariou (Métis). The book is scheduled to be released in February 2019.  Manuel’s largely unpublished work, with its focus on the history and legacies of residential schooling, marks a timely contribution to the present-day need for teachable material on the topic. Manuel was a healer committed to decolonizing theatre to purposely reveal her own therapeutic process through her family’s history of attending the schools. Coupal’s achievement in unearthing the archive of this work with Manuel’s sister, Emalene, and her coeditors is testament to her commitment to ethical editorial practices and to bringing Indian residential school literature into the hands of the Canadian reading public and the classroom.

Coupal has published and submitted articles on teaching trauma and Indian residential school literature, truth and reconciliation education, pedagogies of reconciliation, the cultural work of teaching truth and reconciliation through narrative, and Indigenous positioning protocols in the classroom. Coupal delivered the opening keynote address on truth and reconciliation education for Indigenous Research week at Laurentian University in the fall of 2017. She has shown considerable leadership in Indigenizing the academy by co-organizing an international conference in 2016: MAAMWIZING: Indigeneity in the Academy. Coupal’s research contributions not only respond to the TRC’s Calls to Action, they actively work toward decolonizing pedagogies and decolonizing truth and reconciliation itself.

Faculty member co-recipient of SHRF funding award

Dr. JoLee Sasakamoose is one of six recipients of the 2018-2019 Patient-Oriented Research Leader Awards, co-funded by Saskatchewan Health Research Foundation (SHRF) ($119,894) and Saskatchewan Centre for Patient-Oriented Research (SCPOR) ($129,827), for a project entitled “Muskowekwan First Nation: Regaining and Using Our Culture to Heal Generations Together.”

Dr. Sasakamoose’s research will support the development of a new Healing and Wellness Centre, at the request of the Muskowekwan Chief and Council, alongside partners Touchwood Agency Tribal Council (TATC) and the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN).

“This centre is intended to support First Nation communities in the region in addressing the systemic and long-term effects of historical trauma as a direct result of the residential schooling system in Canada. First Nations’ experiences of many historical and current events have produced lasting detrimental effects on the health of Indigenous peoples, which have, in turn, spawned community healing initiatives. Such healing necessarily engages all aspects of Native Wellness, which is understood as a balance of spirit, motion, mind, and body, in right relation with family, community and the land. Mental health and wellness is, therefore, an intergenerational, communal endeavour for communities. Accordingly, patients, families and community members will be engaged as research co-participants in determining the direction of development for the Healing and Wellness Centre. …The aim is to engage community members in a process of relationship-building and participation so as to accurately understand the wellness assets and needs of the community in order to support the foundation and development of a new Healing and Wellness Centre.” (www.shrf.ca )

New Appointment to Centre for Teaching and Learning

Dr. Kathryn Ricketts, new coordinator of the Centre for Teaching and Learning Photo credit: Shuana Niessen

“I’ve always thought of the Centre as a hub of exchange for the enhancement and enrichment of our own capacities.”

Dr. Kathryn Ricketts has been appointed as Coordinator of the Centre for Teaching and Learning (CTL) for a one-year term that began September 1, 2018. Kathryn brings a wealth of experience from her work with the CTL at Simon Fraser University (SFU) and from serving as a member of the University of Regina’s CTL’s Advisory group since 2014. Kathryn also designed and co-taught the Graduate Student Teaching Development Certificate offered by the CTL each year.

Though Kathryn is a practicing dancer, actor, and visual artist, she says, “I love, and have always loved, the field of education, so much so that I wanted to do my graduate work in education, so I could continue to work with my practicing art forms as a mobilizing force for education.” Kathryn holds a PhD in Arts Education from SFU, and is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Education, University of Regina. From her teaching and research in the areas of literacy, embodiment and cultural studies, movement, and visual arts, Kathryn has come to believe “that people need to work artfully in education, whether they consider themselves artists or not; they need to embrace artful and embodied practices,” she says. Though Kathryn has an extensive background in curriculum design, delivery, and assessment, she hopes to draw on expertise throughout the university, through offering panel discussions and establishing partnerships with other units and centres at the U of R. Within this one-year term, Kathryn hopes to “build something that will have a future beyond the interim period, … to give the Centre traction.” Fresh from her UR Leadership course, Kathryn says, I’m feeling primed and happy to be a leader in a situation that I believe in. I have the opportunity to build something that will make a difference in this University.”

In terms of her vision, Kathryn says, “I’m working towards thinking of the CTL as an idea hub. There are a lot of stigmas in a teaching and learning centre being thought of as a remedial place for broken teaching. I’ve always thought of the Centre as a hub of exchange for the enhancement and enrichment of our own capacities.” Recalling her experiences in Apple stores as a model, Kathryn says, “There’s all these folks that don’t make me feel stupid about the fact I haven’t updated my iPad for a couple of years, or that I didn’t know about this or that. They actually hands off empower me to enhance my skills with technology, and they do it in a way that has a certain kind of grace. For me that’s a beautiful vision, to create a centre where we understand how busy faculty are, that they can’t register all the time, can’t commit for this or that sequence of events, but they need something fast, and they need something that doesn’t make them feel that they are running on a deficit.” All of this would take longer than a 1-year interim, so for now, Kathryn says, “I’m thinking of this year as a dance that I’m learning the steps to by listening to my partners; the whole university is now my sandbox.”

 

Associate Professor | Truth and Reconciliation Education

As of July 1, 2018, Dr. Michelle Coupal will be joining the Faculty of Education, University of Regina as an Associate Professor in the area of Truth and Reconciliation Education.

Dr. Coupal has been working an assistant professor in Indigenous Rhetorics and Literatures in Canada at Laurentian University, and is herself an Indigenous scholar and member of the Bonnechere Algonquin First Nation. Her research and teaching interests include Indigenous pedagogies and profiles, pedagogies of reconciliation, teaching trauma and Indian Residential School literature, trauma and testimony, and Indigenous literatures of Turtle Island.

She brings a deep understanding of and commitment to truth and reconciliation education. Indeed, her record of research, scholarship, teaching and service while at Laurentian advances the TRC Calls to Action as she seeks to make connections between the stories writers tell in Residential school literature and the lives of their student readers. She fosters these connections through her teaching so that her students may become equipped with the tools and vocabulary to understand Indigenous peoples, literature and histories ethically, and to further consider how we are all shaped by the legacies of colonialism in Canada.

Dr. Coupal is currently the principal investigator on a SSHRC funded Insight Development Grant ($55,691) for her project Teaching Trauma and Indian Residential School Literatures in Canada. She has co-edited an anthology of work titled Honouring the Strength of Indian Women: Plays, Stories, and Poems by Vera Manuel and is currently working on a book to be published with Wilfred Laurier UP for the project Teaching Trauma and Indian Residential School Literatures in Canada. She has also published in peer reviewed journals, has published chapters in edited collections, and has disseminated her work broadly at local, national and international conferences. Further, she has served Laurentian University as a member of the organizing committee and Program Chair for MAAMWIZING: Indigeneity in the Academy; L’université à l’heure de la reconciliation held in November, 2016; as the designate for the Associate Vice-President Indigenous Program’s for the Council of English Language Programs, and as a member of several other University, Faculty and Department Committees.

 

New Appointment: Associate Dean, Faculty Development and Human Resources

Dr. Patrick Lewis

Dr. Patrick Lewis, Professor (Early Childhood Education) will assume the role of Associate Dean, Faculty Development and Human Resources (FDHR), beginning July 15, 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Paul Clarke

Many thanks to Dr. Paul Clarke for his hard work, his outstanding contributions, and his dedication to the Faculty as he served in this role for the past four years.

Acting Dean Andrea Sterzuk says, “We are indebted to you Paul for your painstaking thoroughness in the process of performance reviews and the many searches conducted through the office of the Associate Dean, FDHR.”